3.4 Mark the Trail Route
  • Use both topographic maps and air photos to help locate the planned trail route and to pinpoint the trail ocation for later reference.

  • Use a consistent colour or colour combination of plastic flagging to mark the route. Avoid the use of spray paint or tree blazes since adjustments to trail routing are inevitable during the design phase.

  • Consider using colour codes to mark specific construction tasks such as boardwalks, bridges or varying clearing widths.

  • Use a survey crew to stake high standard surfaced trails, for example near campgrounds, where grades and routing may have precise requirements.

  • Mark the trail route on maps and air photos.

  • Flag a rough route first, spacing flagging close enough so that they are just visible. When the route has been refined and is acceptable to the design team, hang enough flags to avoid misinterpretation of the route.

  • Hang the route flagging along the proposed trail centre-line.

  • When hanging flagging on the trail centre-line, consider ground conditions, slope, and the type of groundcover. Where possible, select the route to minimize tree cutting and damage to the roots of trees to remain.

  • Measure the trail distances with a hip chain or other survey device. Label station markers if required for construction, (for example 0+ 100, to mark a bridge location 100 metres from the start of the trail).

  • Remove all flagging tape after construction. Remove any tape from routes not used.

  • Construct the trail within 2 years to ensure the flagging tape is still visible.